art

Watercolorist's Dream Gift guide | Euorpean & UK Edition

Frugal | Gifts Under €25

1. Faber-Castell 12 Polygrade Pencils (€20/ £18)

What: A set of 12 pencils in the style of the original polygrade pencils. The range is from 5B–5H.

Why: All watercolor artists need a good pencil, whether for sketching or for transferring drawings. These pencils are a fun option and very unique. What makes these special is that they are a limited edition group of pencils from a reputable manufacturer that make you feel like you are using a pencil from 1837.

Where:

About:

2. Finetec/ Coliro Pearlcolors Gold & Silver (€25,95)

What: A set of six gold and silver watercolor paints.

Why: These paint are lightfast, handmade in Germany by a family-owned company, and vegan friendly. If you are looking for an awesome gold paint, you can stop searching. These are the best! I have never seen another gold paint that replicates real gold so well.

Where:

About:

3. Viarco ArtGraf Watersoluble Graphite (£14.70)

What: A tin of water-soluble graphite.

Why: this water-soluble graphite is made by a family-owned company in Portugal. They are one of the oldest pencil manufacturers in Europe, so they know their graphite. I love this water-soluble graphite, and it is really useful for sketching or learning to paint with values. If you only have one pain in your travel kit, this would be it.

Where

About

Mid-Range | Gifts $26–75

1. Daler Rowney Artsphere Easel (€50/ £30)

What: A super adjustable easel.

Why: You need to take care of your neck and your back! It’s very easy to hurt your back bending over a table painting watercolors. This easel is the solution. It can adjust in many different ways and hold both papers and canvas.

Where:

About:

2. Eventually Everything Mixes Watercolor Sets ($28–30)

What: Sets of vegan Handmade watercolors in half pans.

Why: These paints are super high quality, very pigmented, and a great deal. They are handmade by an artist in Berlin, they are vegan, and some of the funds go to workshops that teach art to a wider audience. So not only are you getting unique paint, but you are supporting a good cause!

Where:

About:

3. Kolinsky Sable Brushes (€27-€68)

What: Kolinsky Sable brushes made by three different manufacturers at three different price points.

Why:

Da Vinci - there isn’t much to say about this brand, only because everybody knows that they are synonymous with quality. These are some of the best of the best. Every single brush that I have bought from da Vinci has been beautiful and amazing. They are robust and the points remain over time.

Where:

About:

Kolibri - This is probably not a very well-known brand, especially not outside of Germany. However this small family company has been making brushes for a long time. They have a small line of Kolinsky Sable brushes, called their gold line, which is an amazing value for the money. Some even say they are better than the Winsor and Newton Series 7s! Most cheap Kolinsky Sable brushes are not worth your time or mine, but these are excellent and I use them daily.

Where:

About:

Rosemary & Co. - I don’t personally have experience with this brand, but this small, woman-owned company is the favorite of many watercolorists.

Where:

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All Out | Gifts Over $75

1. TALENS Rembrandt Watercolor Set in Wooden Box ($124)

What: A set of 22 Rembrandt artist grade watercolor half pans in a wooden box with a porcelain palette.

Why: This Dutch brand is high quality, and the watercolor paints have a full range of colors. Not only that, but every watercolorist would be happy to have a ceramic palette to paint on.

Where:

About:

2. SENNELIER Haute Couture Watercolor Set (€79,35 )

What: This is a set of 10 tubes of water colors, one porcelain palette, to brushes, and one towel.

Why: Of course Sennelier is a brand that is renowned for making watercolors that are vibrant with a special ability to glaze effortlessly. But this set is also just extremely convenient. It has everything that you need to paint except for water. I’m actually surprised that they included towel, because this is an aspect that most watercolor kits miss.

Where:

About:

3. SCHMINCKE HORADAM® Watercolor Set in Wooden Box(142,89 €)

What: 24 tcubes of Schmincke watercolors in a wooden box with a porcelain palette.

Why: There isn’t a single watercolorist who would be upset if you gifted them this set of watercolors. You get a full range of Schmincke’s colors plus a huge palette to paint with. What more could you want?

Where:

About:

Over the Top! – Over $250

Caran d’Ache 80 MUSEUM Aquarelle Watercolor Pencil assortment (360,00€)

What: A set of 80 extremely highly pigmented watercolor pencils

Why: some of the colors in this set are only available through this gift box. You cannot get them in any other set. Since these are definitely the best watercolor pencils around, it is a great gift to get not just the basic set, but the full range of colors!

Where:

About:

The Sketchers Box ($275)

What: A handmade watercolor box with your name on it.

Why: ! Even though there is a long waiting time, it is definitely a special gift to have a watercolor palette made specifically for you. You can get your name on the pallet, and it comes with a free leather pouch, and space for 18 hole pans. It doesn’t get much more luxurious than this!

Where:

About:

Art Supply Review: Old Holland Watercolors

Scanbot Sep 18, 2017 9.17 PM44.jpg

Old Holland is kind of a strange brand. There are not a lot of reviews of it because of its expensive price in many parts of the world. I’m lucky enough that my local art store has a full collection of this brand at fairly reasonable prices.

Handprint.com doesn’t think very much of this brand because of its lightfastness issues and its odd labeling practices. That’s totally understandable. I don’t think I would ever recommend this brand to a beginner.

The pigments are definitely pure. They claimed that they include twice as much pigment as other brands, and that might be true. However, the binder for these paints is what makes it different from all other paints, and calm cause problems for a new or experienced watercolor artist. The binder has been described as gummy and sticky. And the paints lift extremely easily.

Not normally something that you’d associate with a high-grade artist quality watercolor brand.

Despite all of that, I love these paints!

Background

Many artists don’t like Old Holland watercolors. They say that they are too gummy , too thick, and too difficult to rewet. And all of these things are true to a certain extent. The colors do not stay still on the page, and lift extremely easily. All of these things can easily be considered negative points.

But there is one thing that I think is important to realize about these watercolors. They are really gansai.

Pseudo-Gansai

Okay, or at least they are basically gansai or very similar to gansai.

At my local art store, I picked up this pamphlet talking about Old Holland watercolors that comes directly from the company. Here is what it says.

Old Holland Classic watercolour
These watercolours combine the best qualities of the original colours as used by the Chinese masters. All 168 colours are lightfast. The old fashioned Chinese binder accepts more pigment. This binder is based on distilled water, bleeched cristal arable gums, pure glycerine 99.9% with various mixtures of different natural sugar syrups,special selected honey, rabbit skin glue, rosin varnish (made from roots), seaweed extract, mhyr, etc. The colours tend to be considerably stronger than normal artist’s watercolours, while retaining the transparency required to produce the most delicate hues. Due to the higher level of pigmentation the intensity and brilliance is superior, while less quantity of paint is required to make the artwork.

Pamphlet

Okay, so what does that sound like? If you have read my blog post about Gansai, this will all sound very familiar.

And it makes sense. The Dutch were one of the few countries that were able to trade with the Chinese and the Japanese in the 17th century. You have probably heard of the Dutch East India Company, haven’t you?

Gansai is a Japanese art medium, but many of Japanese traditional arts have their roots Chinese culture. I don’t know what the Chinese word for gansai is, but I’m pretty sure that is what is going on here with these Old Holland watercolors.

So the characteristics fit. They lift easily, they are extremely vibrant, and extremely pigmented. The only thing that seems to be different is that the colors also mix with absolutely no problems.

Also, it is important to note that this binder is the main reason why old Holland colors have a bit of a lightfastness problem in some formulations. Some of the binder combinations that Old Holland uses yellow over time.

Stats

Quality Where Does it Stand?
Lightfastness varying lightfastness, I would not trust the lightfastness rating given by Old Holland
Where Is It Made? Holland
Identification (Color Labeling and Accuracy) No pigment number or other information on the tube, also the label does not match the color inside at all
Tube size 6 mL
Price US$6 - US$22

Colors Reviewed

  • GOLDEN BAROK RED – PO 65
  • SCHEVENINGEN YELLOW LIGHT – PY 174
  • ULTRAMARINE BLUE DEEP – PB 29

Swatches

These colors are all extremely vibrant. They are surprisingly transparent, and every single one of them is extremely lifting. I have never seen colors that lifted as easily as this. You could put a drop of water on the paint and it would completely come off the page.

This can actually be really frustrating when you’re painting because you can basically erase the entire thing depending on what paper you are using.

This Ultramarine Blue Deep is my favorite ultramarine. The granulation is absolutely gorgeous and unlike the granulation I have seen in any other brand. I will definitely be buying more of this.

Scheveningen Yellow Light is now my favorite warm yellow. It’s transparent, and just glows.

Mixing

The colors mixed together extremely well. They harmonize and have a lot of movement when used wet in wet. The painting that I did using these colors has a sort of gentle harmony to it.

Re-wetting

This is where these colors fall down. Because of the binder, it’s extremely difficult to rewet these pains in comparison to other artistry paints. You have to add water to them before the pigment will come off of the pan.

Glazing and Layering

I don’t use these paints when I am planning to do a lot of layers. Or at least I don’t use them on the bottom layers, particularly because of that issue with listing. These colors don’t stay down very well. They always want to come off the page if there is any sort of agitation on top.

So I normally only use these paints if I am going to be doing a painting that doesn’t require a lot of layers, or if I want to use them on top of already painted layers.

They glaze well, and are very vibrant.

Vibrancy

Extremely vibrant, obviously full of pigment. Beautiful. There are variations of tone within each color.

Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Extremely High Pigment Load No pigment information on the tube
The Most Beautiful Granulation Difficult to Rewet
Very Vibrant Lifts easily
Unique Pigments Extremely Expensive
Questionable Lightfastness
Strange Names
The line is full of overly complicated convenience mixes

Who is it for?

Obviously not a reasonable person.

Not for anyone who is a stickler about single pigment paints or lightfastness.

I will probably continue buying these pains, but I will attempt to be aware of the limitations of the paint and careful about the lightfastness.

This brand is definitely a “luxury” brand if you think about the price and the lack of functionality. This isn’t really a brand that you go to for consistency or predictable quality. This is a brand that you go to because there’s just something about it that you love, despite all of the negative aspects.

So this is for somebody who has already tried artist grade watercolors, and is already very comfortable with them, and wants to be a little silly with their paints.

The Last Word

  • Price: ★
  • Quality: ★★★
  • Overall: ★★

Official Website

Availability

In Europe

Other Discussions

Art Supply Review : Mitsubishi KH20 Pencil Sharpener

This is my new favorite pencil sharpener. It’s easy. Quick. Light. Quiet. Efficient.

What else could you want?

I got this pencil sharpener specifically because I was tired of being frightened to sharpen my Caran d’Ache Museum watercolor pencils. I also thought it was probably time to upgrade since I was doing more work with graphite.

This was definitely an awesome upgrade.

Facts Where Does it Stand?
Name Mitsubishi KH 20 Handheld Pencil Sharpener
Color Black, red, blue
Type Handcrank desktop sharpener with autostop, rubber grips, blunt and long point modes
Point Type Blunt and Long point
Size 13 x 8.5 x 8 cm
Body Material Plastic
Blade Material Metal
Made In China
Price

It’s pretty surprising that this pencil sharpener is made in China, that’s not exactly what you would expect from Mitsubishi. Despite that, there’s no reason to assume that there is any kind of deficiency in quality. The sharpener is sturdy and works very smoothly.

Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Stabilizes pencil while sharpening Too large to travel with
Autostop Can shorten pencils a great deal
Can sharpen (slightly) larger pencils Not metal, so maybe not super sturdy?
Both long and blunt tips Sometimes sharpens a bit off center
Huge waste receptacle, with viewing hole Does not include desk clamp, must be purchased separately
Fairly quiet
Includes a hole for a desk clamp
Easy disassembly for repairs or troubleshooting
Rubberized base for stability
Rubberized clamps do not damage pencils

Who is it for?

This sharpener is ideal for anybody who just wants to get a good tip every time with no fuss. They are sharpeners that give a sharper point, but not much sharper. If you don’t want to spend time fussing around with those, this is perfect. You could go through an entire collection of pencils in a few minutes and have consistent results.

Since the cutting mechanism is not entirely made out of metal, I wonder just how long the blades will remain sharp. I’m not sure if there is a replacement available.

The blunt tip is an interesting added feature. It’s probably not interesting for most pencil users, but for artists who use colored pencils, it can be helpful to have a broader tip sometimes.

I have seen it recommended that after sharpening several colored pencils, it’s a good idea to sharpen a graphite pencil to make sure that the blades are not excessively dulled.

The Last Word

  • Price: ★★★
  • Quality: ★★★★
  • Overall: ★★★★

I don’t think anybody could go wrong with this sharpener. It’s a good price, good quality, and it doesn’t mar your expensive pencils!

Official Website

Availability

In USA

In Europe

Other Discussions

Rotring Tikky Graphic Technical Pen | Inktober Art Supply Review

Rotring’s Radiograph and Isograph are probably the most well-known technical pens and that they had been in the market for a very long time. But how does their cheaper, non-reusable version stand up?

Facts Where Does it Stand?
Name Rotring Tikky Graphic
Color Black
Tip Size .1, .2.,.3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .8
Tip Material Metallic fibre-tip
Reusable? No
Type of ink Pigmented
Archival? Uncertain
Made In China
Price $3.50

I didn’t have any problem using these pens. The alliance that I got from them were not quite as crisp as I would prefer, even on very thick Bristol paper. Because of that, I probably wouldn’t be using them very often for delicate work.

Quality Where Does it Stand?
Drying Speed .1 mm dries in two seconds, .3 mm dries in three seconds, .5 mm dries in eight seconds
Pooling The bigger sizes will pool if left in one spot
Feathering Feathers on Bristol paper
Bleeding/Showthrough none
Appearance over Pencil normal
Waterproof yes
Copic/ Alcohol Marker proof yes
Eraserproof yes

Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Line is dark black and pretty solid Bleeds on Bristol paper
Ink flows very quickly and smoothly Makes a thicker line than some other pens for the same size of tip
Ink reservoir window lets you know when the pen is running out Ink can smudge even when you think that it is dry
Copic, water, and eraser proof Bigger sizes pool ink at the end of lines

Who is it for?

Anyone who really wants a technical pen that can keep up with their fast movements. Since the ink flows very quickly, there is no stopping or sputtering of the line. This is great for anyone who doesn’t want to slow down.

However, depending on the way you like to draw, the ink might actually be too much. It bleeds a bit, and the lines are a bit thicker than normal. If you want superduper fine delicate lines, this is probably not the pen.

The Last Word

  • Price: ★★★
  • Quality: ★★★
  • Overall: ★★★

Official Website

Availability

In USA

In Europe

Other Discussions

What is Gansai? | Watercolor 101

What is Gansai?

You have probably heard of the big brands like Kuretake Gansai Tambi, or Kisshou Gansai, but what is gansai really?

Gansai (顔彩) is traditional Japanese watercolor. In English, we tend to refer to both types of paints as simply watercolor. However there are two words for these types of paints in Japanese. Gansai is written 顔彩 and the type of water colors that are more traditional in the West (also called transparent watercolors) are written 水彩.
While Western watercolor is traditionally bound with gum arabic, gansai is bound with a combination that could include glue, starch, gum arabic ,beeswax, sugar syrup, sugar, or glycerin [1][2][3][4]. The glue is made from concentrated collagen and gelatin that has been extracted from animal and fish skins through boiling [5] [6] . When the pigment and binder is mixed together, they are dried in pans. Those in large square pans are called gansai 顔彩, and those in round dishes are called teppatsu 鉄鉢 [7]. They can also be formed into a sort of watercolor pastel/crayon that is called bouenogu 棒絵具 [8]

What is it used for?

More Convenient Version of Iwaenogu 岩絵具 or Suiengou 水干絵具

Iwaenogu 岩絵具 is a type of traditional Japanese paint which is generally made from semi precious stone and other pigments (such as Cinnabar, malachite, azurite, lapis lazuli, etc.) that have been crushed and mixed with the same type of glue that is used in gansai by hand right before it is used[9]. They are very expensive and available in a range of particle sizes.
Gansai is not made with the same type of very expensive pigments used in iwaenogu. Generally, gansai uses the same pigments as suiengou 水干絵具 [10]. Suiengou is made from fine pigments or dyes combined with chalk made from shellfish [11] or purified clay [12]. The pigments are also a bit cheaper than iwaenogu even though they are still of high quality and very lightfast. Just like iwaenogu, suienogu is sold in pigment form and must have glue added to it just before painting.
Since gansai has already been mixed at the proper ratio and is already dried in a pan or dish, it is much more convenient to use than iwaenogu. It’s like the difference between using Western pre-made pan paints versus making your paint by yourself each time you are going to paint a picture.

Underpainting for Iwaenogu 岩絵具

Both suiengou and gansai are often used as the underpainting for iwaenogu because they are much cheaper than the expensive pigments used in that type of paint. By painting with one of these two, the artist can cover up the white of the paper or cloth and provide a ground for the Iwaengou to stick to [13].

Sketching and Etegami [14]

Because it is not as expensive or difficult to use as iwaenogu or suienogu, gansai is often recommended for sketching. Iwaenogu and suienogu are not as convenient as gansai, since they come in pigment form and must be combined with a binder right before painting. On the other hand, gansai is already premixed and in a container, so they are ready to go whenever the feeling to paint strikes you. That makes them a perfect sketching medium.
These are also the reasons that make them great for etegami or Japanese picture postcards. Etegami are meant to be fast, casual, and imperfect. They are full of simple, bright colors and drawings that are meant to express emotion more than accuracy. So this quick medium is also suited to these types of drawings.

Characteristics

Vibrancy and Opacity

When gansai is watered down it retains its vibrancy more than Western watercolors do. Also,gansai’s binder can give it a shiny finish.
Gansai tend to be more opaque than transparent watercolors. Remember that these paints were formulated to work on Japanese paper. Transparent watercolors do not show up very well on Japanese paper, and the additional opacity of gansai help them to appear on the paper with little bleeding.

Lifting

The binder adhesion in gansai is weak compared to other Japanese paints. As a result, they tend to lift much easier than most transparent watercolors, even when dry.
There are a few things that could contribute to this. When gansai is used on Japanese washi paper, it doesn’t lift as easily as it does on Western watercolor paper, especially when used with ultrasoft Japanese goat-hair brushes. Traditional Japanese paintings are and also not as dependent on layering as Western watercolor paintings, so there is less opportunity for the paint to lift when new layers are added.

Colors

The colors of traditional Japanese gansai sets are often different from those in transparent watercolors. These paints were created for Japanese picture painting, which comes from a different tradition than European painting. Japanese colors are also based on colors that can actually be seen in nature, which would probably explain the abundance of blues and greens in many gansai palettes.
The colors can give a calm and peaceful feeling to the viewer because they are not overly saturated.

Pans

Why are gansai pans so big? Japanese brushes can be much bigger than Western-style brushes, so they need a bigger pan to ensure the brush hairs are not damaged.

Mixing

Gansai were not made to be mixed in the same way that transparent watercolors are. This is part of the reason that many gansai sets do not come with a mixing palette.
I have read many reviews that say that gansai paints get muddy when mixed, this makes sense considering the traditional background of the paints, however I have never experienced this. The colors I have been able to mix from gansai have been very clear and bright.

Quality

Many reviews disparage the quality of gansai because they don’t act in the same way that Western watercolors do. I think that this is unfair. They are not the same type of paint, so they can’t be expected to behave in the same way.
Of course, just like there are high-grade and low-grade watercolors, or high-grade and low-grade oil paints, there are high-grade and low-grade gansai paints.

Western Paints (eg: Winsor and Newton, Schmincke) versus Gansai

Western Paints Gansai
Come in half and full pans Generally come in one size pan
Gum Arabic binder Binder may be a combination of glue, starch, gum arabic ,beeswax, sugar syrup, sugar, and glycerin
Tend to be more transparent Can be more opaque
High quality versions mix well Can be more difficult to mix 3 or more colors
Varying staining levels Mostly lifts very easily
Dries Matte Dries Glossy
Available in Tubes Not available in tubes

Links

About Gansai

About Traditional Japanese Painting in General

About Japanese Colors

Blue and Green

Other Colors


  1. http://www.tanseido.jp/item/c00049/  ↩

  2. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/jn/260614/meaning/m0u/  ↩

  3. https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7September5September5%E5%85September7#.E6.97.A5.E6.9C.AC.E7.94.BB.E7.B5.B5.E5.85.B7  ↩

  4. https://swu.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=pages_view_main&active_action=repository_view_main_item_detail&item_id=178&item_no=1&page_id=30&block_id=97  ↩

  5. http://zokeifile.musabi.ac.jp/228%86Thu0/  ↩

  6. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/jn/260614/meaning/m0u/  ↩

  7. http://ameblo.jp/saibyou/entry–12019174174.html  ↩

  8. http://zokeifile.musabi.ac.jp/%E6%97Thursday5%E6%9CThursdayC%E7%94SeptemberB%E7September5September5%E5%85September7/  ↩

  9. http://www.geocities.jp/wa_style_site/nihonga/nihonga2  ↩

  10. http://zokeifile.musabi.ac.jp/%E6September0September4%E5September9September2%E7September5September5%E5%85September7/  ↩

  11. https://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1335140508  ↩

  12. http://www.kissho-nihonga.co.jp/products/suihienogu/  ↩

  13. http://zokeifile.musabi.ac.jp/%E6September0September4%E5September9September2%E7September5September5%E5%85September7/  ↩

  14. http://www.kuretake.co.jp/create/letter/index.html  ↩

Art Supply Review: M Graham Artist's Gouache

When I ran out of some colors in my Winsor and Newton gouache set I decided to try some different brands. At the top of my list was M Graham gouache. I am really happy that I decided to try these since they have definitely lived up to the artist grade gouache claims that I have heard about.

Stats

Quality Where Does it Stand?
Lightfastness 31 out of 35 colors in the line have an LF I rating of Excellent, and 4 out of 82 colors in the line have an LF II rating of Very Good. All of the colors in the line have a very high permanence rating.
Where Is It Made? USA
Identification (Color Labeling and Accuracy) The tubes have color swatches on the front that are fairly accurate. They also have the name in English, French, and German. The tubes also include the series number, like fastness rating, pigment number along with the pigment name, vehicle, and ASTM D – 4236 confirmation.
Tube size 15 mL (.5 ounces)
Price Around $5-$8 per tube

Colors Reviewed

  • Quinacridone rose – lightfastness I, PV 19
  • Hansa yellow (primary) – lightfastness II, PY3
  • Pthalocyanine blue (primary) – lightfastness I, PB 15:3
  • Raw Sienna – lightfastness I, PBr7
  • Burnt Sienna – lightfastness I, PBr7
  • Lamp Black – lightfastness I, PBk6

Swatches

There is so much pigment in these paints. It’s just totally vibrant. It’s also very clear that they do not add a new pacifiers to the payments because classically transparent pigments like Quinacridone rose and Phthalocyanine blue are not opaque unless they are applied extraordinarily thickly. That’s fine with me because you can always add white to make your pigment more opaque if you want to.

The opaque paints like raw sienna, burnt sienna, and lamp black are completely and totally opaque.

All of the colors water down very nicely and they are not chalky at all. They have a velvety matte finish that is just wonderful to look at.

Mixing

There is absolutely no problem mixing these colors. The all mixed very cleanly. Actually, there is so much pigment in some of the colors that you may need to water them down to get the shade that you desire.

Re-wetting

M Graham gouache re-wets very easily. There is no problem and the colors are not diluted. You do not need to scrub of your brush, and you can get very opaque colors with little difficulty. This is totally different from the Winsor and Newton gouache.

Pros and Cons

Pros Cons
Lightfast Colors Not easily available outside of the United States of America
Re-wets very well Product line is not as large as some other brands, although that is probably because they focus on lightfast pigments and single pigment colors
Artist grade gouache Not all paints are completely opaque without adding white
Does not contain chalk or pacifiers
All the colors dilute extremely well
Great price

Who is it for?

Anyone and everyone who is interested in learning to paint with gouache! The colors mix beautifully. It takes a lot of the frustration that I felt with the Winsor and Newton gouache out of the painting process.

The M Graham paints are even slightly cheaper than the Windsor and Newton paints, so it seems like there are no downsides.

The Last Word

  • Price: ★★★★★
  • Quality: ★★★★★
  • Overall: ★★★★★

I love these paints. They’re the best gouache that I have ever used. I would recommend them to anyone.

The only potential downside is that it is a little more difficult to acquire these paints over here in Europe. There are only two places that I know of where they can be bought in Europe, and that’s at a more expensive price than available in the United States.

Outside of that, I don’t see any reason why anyone would be upset with these paints unless they really do not want to modify the opacity of their own paints with white.

Just Go Buy Them Already!

Availability

In Europe

Other Discussions

Art Supply Review: Winsor and Newton Watercolor Marker

I'm not really sure what I was expecting when I bought this!

Something between a watercolor marker and a Copic marker? An alternative to the Tombow dual brush? Something to allow me to do watercolor lettering without lugging around paints and water?

Well, this pen is none of those. And that's not necessarily a bad thing!

Stats

Quality Where Does it Stand?
Ergonomics/Feel It’s a bit thicker than normal pens, so that can be a bit uncomfortable.
Tip Type Felt
Firmness Medium
Ability to Flex Medium
Tip Size Broad
Sharpness Medium
Ink flow Wet
Pigmentation Dark
Self Cleaning Unknown
Bleed No bleed
Watersolubility Watersoluable / Not Waterproof
Copic/Alcohol Marker Proof Yes
Smell No smell
Lightfastness Very Lightfast
Acidity Unknown
Toxicity Non-toxic
Color Availability 36 colors

Pros

  • Holy cow! This thing is pigmented. Just like the Faber Castell Pitt pens, these watercolor markers are actually formulated with pigments. However, instead of Indian ink, these markers use the same pigments that are used in watercolor paints. I really didn't expect the color to be so intensely pigmented, but they are wonderfully deep and rich. It is a very very wet pen.

  • In terms of handling, I would say that this is somewhat like the Tombow dual brush pen but a bit stiffer. It gives wonderfully thick downstrokes.

  • This is actually meant to be a watercolor marker, and the intense pigments definitely would result in beautiful hues for painting or sketching as well as calligraphy or hand lettering.

  • The colors blend out very easily with a bit of water.

  • You might not care about this if you're not into watercolors, but the fact that each brush is labeled just like a tube of water color would be makes it really easy for me to understand what is going on inside of the brush.

  • The color label is very accurate, so you don't have to second-guess what color will be coming out on the paper.

Cons

  • The nib is nice and flexible, but only to a certain point. It seems to stop somewhere halfway up the brush, which is kind of weird.

  • The tip of the brush is not very sharp, so upstrokes are not as thin as I would like.

  • Something about the brush seems a little squishy or unstable, so it's a bit harder to control than the Tombow dual brush pen.

My Rating: ★★★★☆

Actually, this was very close to having five stars. I mean, high lightfastness, non-toxic, no odor, what’s there not to like?

However, I have a bit of difficulty managing this pen in comparison to the Tombow dual brush pen, so it gets knocked down one star.

Still, I would recommend this to anyone who is looking for a highly pigmented, lightfast brush pen.

Other Reviews Of This Pen

Where to Get It

Official Website

Water Colour Markers | Winsor & Newton

Elsewhere